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About Feature 1

Progressive Pioneers


Story Musgrave

Story Musgrave

Class of 1960

Dr. F. Story Musgrave ’60 earned a Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry from Marietta and already had a burgeoning career in the U.S. Marine Corps by the time he arrived on campus. He had Bachelor of Science degrees in Mathematics and Statistics from Syracuse University, and MBA in Operations Analysis and Computer Programming from UCLA, an M.D. from Columbia University, Master of Science degrees in Physiology and Biophysics from the University of Kentucky, and a Master of Arts in Literature from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. In 1967, he was chosen by NASA to serve as a scientist-astronaut. By the time he retired from NASA in 1997, he had logged in nearly 1,300 hours in space during six space flights and is still the only astronaut to have flown missions on all five Space Shuttles.

 


 

Charles Dawes

Charles Dawes

Class of 1884

Charles G. Dawes was a native of Marietta and graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1884. Soon after earning his law degree from Cincinnati Law School, he began his career in public service. He served as the Comptroller of Currency under President William McKinley; as the General of the Corps of Engineers; and as Chair of the Purchasing Board of the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I under President Warren G. Harding. While serving as the Director of the Allied Preparations Commissions — a post he was appointed to in 1923 by President Harding — he worked on plan to help Germany restore its economy and make reparations for the war. For his work on the Dawes Plan, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize of 1925. That year, he was the successful Vice Presidential candidate with Presidential candidate Calvin Coolidge. After that Administration ended, he served as the U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom and later returned to the banking industry.

 


 

Kathleen Reddy-Smith

Kathleen Reddy-Smith

Class of 1971

Kathleen Reddy-Smith ’71 earned a Bachelor of Arts in History from Marietta and earned graduate degrees from Georgetown University, Harvard University and the U.S. Naval War College before entering the U.S. Foreign Service. Prior to her diplomatic work, she was a credit analyst and an international credit specialist with the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve. For nearly three decades, she was dedicated to humanitarian and diplomatic work in countries such as Pakistan, Belgium, France, Italy and Bosnia as a Foreign Service Officer. After returning from her service in Europe, she served as the Deputy Director of the U.S. Government Task Force on Avian Flu, coordinating U.S. and international efforts to address the global threat it posed. She is currently the Diplomat-in-Residence at Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts, where she lectures on foreign affairs, negotiation strategy and women’s issues.

 


 

Richard Krause

Richard Krause

Class of 1947

Dr. Richard M. Krause ’47 is a preeminent research scientist, physician and scientific author who was appointed the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in the mid-1970s just as a new global threat was emerging. While serving as the Assistant Surgeon General of the U.S. Health Service, the world began seeing the emergence of the AIDS epidemic. His research team was the first in the medical community to identify it as a virus that was transmitted through blood interaction. He has served on the faculty of New York’s Rockefeller University, Washington University in St. Louis, and at Emory University School of Medicine, where he was the Dean and the Robert W. Woodruff Professor of Medicine. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Marietta and earned a Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry.

 


 

Joy Williams

Joy P. Williams

Class of 1963

Joy P. Williams ’63 graduated Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum laude with a degree in English and earned a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from the University of Iowa. After working for a few years as a researcher and data analyst for the U.S. Navy, she decided to pursue fiction writing full time. Her first novel, State of Grace, was critically acclaimed and garnered a 1974 National Book Award nomination. The year she published her book, she was recognized with a National Endowment for the Arts Grant. She also earned a 1974 Guggenheim Fellowship, the National Magazine Award for Fiction in 1980 and the Academy-Institute Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1989. Her novel, The Quick and the Dead, was a finalist for the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.