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Transition Tips

The transition from high school to college life is exciting, but it can also be stressful. Whether your student is a first-time or transfer college student or living off campus for the first time, acknowledge the impact of change in his or her life.

Getting Involved

  • Encourage your student to apply to become an Orientation Leader at the end of their first year
  • Suggest exploration of opportunities for involvement in the residence hall or a student organization
  • Encourage your student to look into joining a fraternity or sorority. For more information, visit http://greeklife.marietta.edu/
  • Encourage your student to read the campus newspaper, The Marcolian, and see organizations or activities that interest him or her
  • Suggest your student attend or become involved in College Union Board events
  • Make sure your students voice is heard! Encourage your student to participate in assessments to provide feedback on campus services and academic experiences

Academics

  • By sophomore year, your student should select a major, refine career options, and begin defining their purpose. Encourage your student to participate in the many employment fairs, workshops, and services sponsored by the Career Center
  • By junior year, your student should seek an internship experience in their career field. The Career Center can assist your student in this process.
  • By senior year, your student should attend Career Fairs and Graduate School Fairs to gain exposure to all of the opportunities that await!
  • By senior year, students should have a current resume listing part-time employment and internship experiences. Career Counselors are available at the Career Center in the Gilman Student Center
  • Be aware that students might not earn the same superior grades in college that they did in high school or when their courses were easier
  • Discuss with your student the academic and tutoring services available on campus if they did not do as well as they had expected. Campus tutoring services can be found at the Academic Resource Center
  • Encourage your student to utilize the Writing Center to improve their paper writing skills

Finding Direction

  • Anticipate that your student may call home to let off steam, share worries or sort through situations out loud. Use these moments as opportunities to let them do their own problem-solving by listening, asking questions, and affirming your belief in their decision making
  • By sophomore year, your student should select a major, refine career options, and begin defining their purpose. Encourage your student to participate in the many employment fairs, workshops, and services sponsored by the Career Center
  • Should you become aware that your student is using alcohol as a way of dealing with stress, suggest that he/she gather information and talk to a counselor in Counseling Services
  • Examine the need for career counseling to establish career or academic goals