English Department Faculty

Dr. Nathan Anderson

Nathan Anderson

Title: Assistant Professor

Department: English

Education: Ph.D. in Creative Writing, Ohio University, 2006; Master of Fine Arts in Poetry, Eastern Washington University, 2001; Bachelor of Arts in English, Eastern Washington University, 1999.

Research Interests: In both poetry and fiction, I am interested in the role of voice, the relationship between individual and place, and representations of gender.

Recent Publications: Best American Poetry 2013

Courses (Fall 2014): College Composition, Basics of Composition, Creative Writing, Business Writing

Courses (Spring 2015): College Composition, Poetry Workshop, Business Writing

Phone: (740) 376-4638

Email: nathan.anderson@marietta.edu

What can a student expect when taking one of your classes?

An open, welcoming atmosphere in which ideas can be exchanged and students can grow intellectually, creatively, and interpersonally.

What excites you about teaching at Marietta College?

Working with both excellent students and colleagues.

When you aren’t teaching, what other activities do you enjoy?

Reading, writing, watching movies, spending time with friends and family

Do you prefer flipping through the pages of a book or an e-book?

Book

What is your favorite location on campus and why?

The classroom . . . and the library . . . and the grounds around campus, because each provides a different space for interacting with others.

What is your favorite Marietta College event?

All Scholars Day

 


 

Dr. Janet Bland

Janet L. Bland

Title: McCoy Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Accreditation

Department: English

Education: Ph.D. in Creative Writing, University of Denver, 2001; Master of Arts in English/Creative Writing, Temple University, 1994; Bachelor of Arts in English with a Writing Emphasis, University of Washington, 1987

Research Interests: Creative Writing, Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Fiction, (Post Modernist, Women’s, Non-western), Narratology, Post-structuralism, and Cultural Studies

Recent Publications: Selected publications include a writing textbook The Civil Mind (Thomson/Wadsworth, 2006); a short story collection, A Fish Full of River (Ghost Road Press, 2006); and "The Possum: Teaching Creativity" (Teachers and Writers, 2012)

Courses (Fall 2014): Representations of Technology in Film and Literature and Self-Expression: Reading and Writing Memoir

Courses (Spring 2015): Introduction to Creative Writing and College Composition

Phone: (740) 376-4626

Email: janet.bland@marietta.edu

What can a student expect when taking one of your classes?

A lot of writing, and reading, and an engaged exploration of the creative process.

What excites you about teaching at Marietta College?

I really enjoy the process of insightful discover that we explore together, as students begin to think of themselves as creative people.

When you aren’t teaching, what other activities do you enjoy?

I enjoy travel, spending time with family, going to movies, all sorts of music, and I am quite a bad guitar player.

Do you prefer flipping through the pages of a book or an e-book?

I want to read good fiction — with engaging characters and a compelling narrative voice. I don’t really care if this sort of writing arrives in paperback, hardback, on my Kindle, or on my iPad — I read all forms.

What is your favorite location on campus and why? I really like the lower level of the library, just outside of Special Collections. It’s peaceful and there are comfy chairs.

What is your favorite Marietta College event?

Graduation

 


 

Tim Catalano

Tim Catalano

Hilyer Associate Professor

Dept: English

740-376-4636

catalant@marietta.edu

tim.catalano@marietta.edu

Office: THMS 205

Degrees: B.A. Wilmington College, M.A. University of Dayton, Ph.D. University of Louisville

Year appointed: 2001

Dr. Catalano is an Associate Professor in English. He edited a bi-monthly journal, American Whitewater, from 2003-2008, and is a specialist in rhetoric and composition.

His teaching interests include basic writing, introductory composition, technical writing, and scientific writing.

Dr. Catalano was granted tenure in the fall of 2006.

 


 

Carolyn Hares-Stryker

Carolyn Hares-Stryker

McCoy Professor

Dept: English

740-376-4641

harestrc@marietta.edu

carolyn.hares.stryker@marietta.edu

Office: THMS 307

Degrees: Ph.D. (University of California-Davis), 1991; Master's (University of California-Davis), 1987; Bachelor's (University of California-Santa Barbara), 1985

Year appointed: 1992

Dr. Hares-Stryker is one of 16 current faculty members who have earned the prestigious McCoy Professor recognition. She was promoted to professor in the fall of 2006.

Dr. Hares-Stryker has published a number of articles, book chapters, and two books. Her most recent book came out last year, "The Illustrators of Kenneth Grahame's 'The Wind in the Willows,' 1908-2008," and her most recent article was a biographical and bibliographic study of the life and work of Henry Justice Ford, the late Victorian and early Edwardian artist best known as the illustrator of Andrew Lang's many colored fairy books. Her other research interests include Medieval literature, mythology, Victorian literature and pre-Raphaelitism.

On campus, she directed the Honors Program for five years and has taught a variety of classes, including "World Mythology," "The Concept of Tragedy," "The Female Gothic," and "Wilde, Women and Dracula: Gender and Culture at the Fin-de-siecle". She is one of three Marietta faculty members to ever be honored with the McCoy designation twice.

 


 

Beverly Hogue

Dr. Bev Hogue

Title: McCoy Professor

Department: English

Education: Ph.D. in English, Bowling Green State University, 2000; Master of Arts in English, University of Kentucky, 1987; Bachelor of Arts in English, Asbury College, 1984

Research Interests: Postcolonial literature; relationships between literature and place; creative nonfiction pedagogy

Recent Publications: “Thirteen Ways of Looking at an Essay: Nature Writing through Multiple Lenses.” Pedagogy 13.3 (Fall 2013): 549-53.

“Suffering that Slips through Rhetorical Gaps: Colson Whitehead’s John Henry Days.” On Suffering: An Inter-Disciplinary Dialogue on Narrative and the Meaning of Suffering. Ed. Nate Hinerman and Matthew Sutton. Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2012. 103-118.

Courses (Fall 2014): College Composition, Sports Literature, Concepts of Comedy, African-American Literature

Courses (Spring 2015): Honors Literature, Survey of U.S. Literature II, Representative American Writers

Phone: (740) 376-4657

Email: bev.hogue@marietta.edu

What can a student expect when taking one of your classes?

Students can expect to view texts as a portal to the world of ideas. In class we take those ideas out and play with them to see what kind of meaning we can make, and then we write analytical essays to develop skills in communicating those ideas to others.

What excites you about teaching at Marietta College?

I love seeing students take exciting steps in developing their reading, writing, and critical thinking skills, but more than anything else I love seeing them step beyond familiar territory to take risks in their writing and thinking.

When you aren’t teaching, what other activities do you enjoy?

I love walking in the woods, watching birds, going out in my canoe, and spending time with family, and I’m never happier than when I have a camera in my hand.

Do you prefer flipping through the pages of a book or an e-book?

I use print books and e-books for different reasons: e-books for light reading I don’t intend to use in class, print books for texts I need to write all over.

What is your favorite location on campus and why?

I love the Legacy Library. It’s bright, comfortable, and full of books, and if you sit quietly, you can feel the energy produced by people thinking.

What is your favorite Marietta College event?

Commencement is great because I get to see students reach a goal and celebrate with their families, and it’s always exciting to see students who have worked really hard receive the rewards they deserve.

 


 

Nicole Livengood

Nicole C. Livengood

Title: Associate Professor

Department: English

Education: Ph.D. in American Literature, Purdue University, 2007; Master of Arts in English, Purdue University, 2002; Bachelor of Arts in English and Political Science, University of Minnesota, Morris, 1999.

Research Interests: My current research project focuses on women’s bodies in nineteenth-century American sensational texts, especially trial reports. General research interests include nineteenth-century women authors, especially Elizabeth Stoddard, Julia Ward Howe, and Lydia Maria Child; slavery and literature; intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality; and disability studies.

Recent Publications: “Freakery and the Discursive Limits of Be-ing in The Hermaphrodite.” Legacy: Women Writing Disability. 31.1 (2013): 40-61.

“The Female Body and ‘Sin[s] Against Convention’ in Elizabeth Stoddard’s Daily Alta California Newspaper Columns.” Studies in American Humor 3.24 (2011): 31-44.

Courses (Fall 2014): The Early American Survey, 1500-Civil War; Diversity in Literature; Introduction to Composition

Courses (Spring 2015): I will be on sabbatical!

Phone: (740) 376-4379

Email: nl00@marietta.edu

What can a student expect when taking one of your classes?

I use my assignments and readings to try to nurture curiosity and engagement, and to help students make our materials relevant to their own lives while also developing transferable skills that will serve them well in the world of work, no matter what their future field. Depending on the course theme, this may mean using Special Collections documents to make the history of Slavery and Abolition in Ohio come alive for the Marietta College community; field trips to Cincinnati’s Underground Railroad Freedom Center or to the local Mound Cemetery; or creative projects that ask students to make connections between and among our texts and the centuries.

What excites you about teaching at Marietta College?

Marietta students and faculty are so engaged. There is a lot of synergy and collaboration inside and outside of the classroom.

When you aren’t teaching, what other activities do you enjoy?

Being outside with my dog, Zoey; experiencing new places and restaurants; reading thrillers and stuff written by actual real-live people!

Do you prefer flipping through the pages of a book or an e-book?

I prefer a real book, of course! Although I love that a lot of the books I read are available online or free on Kindle because I would not be able to study them, otherwise.

What is your favorite location on campus and why?

The grassy area behind Harrison Hall is a good place to take a deep breath and reflect.

What is your favorite Marietta College event?

I look forward to the Student Art shows and the theater productions. We have such talented students!

 


 

Joseph M. Sullivan

Joseph M. Sullivan

Associate Professor of English

Dept: English

740-376-4639

sullivaj@marietta.edu

joe.sullivan@marietta.edu

Office: Thomas 216A

Degrees: Ph.D. in English Literature (University of Toledo), 1999; Master of Arts in English and American Literature (Marquette University), 1991; Bachelor's of Arts in English and American Literature (Loras College), 1989

Year appointed: 2001

Dr. Sullivan, who is the faculty sponsor of Marietta's English Honor Society (Sigma Tau Delta), teaches British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Restoration. Other recent courses he has taught include Senior Capstone Seminar, Shakespeare, Milton, Chaucer, Renaissance Drama, 18th Century English Novel, 20th Century British and American Poetry, and Film Study.

He arrived at Marietta in the fall of 2001 after teaching one year at Santa Clara (Calif.) University. In the summer of 2004, he received a Professional Improvement Grant to research and draft a monograph entitled Shakespeare in Hindsight; Or, What You Willed.

Dr. Sullivan was granted tenure and promoted to associate professor in the fall of 2006.