English at Marietta College
Thomas Hall and Erwin Bell Tower

Major & Minor Requirements:

Requirements for a Major in English:

45 hours in English beyond Writing 101 or Honors 111.
This constitutes :

ENGL 161
12 hours of Cultural Perspectives
9 hours of Conceptual Perspectives
15 hours from Specialized Perspective
(one of which MUST be pre-19th century)
3 hours from Perspectives in Writing
3 hours Senior Perspective

Requirements for a Minor in English:
24 hours in English beyond WRIT 101 and HONR 11.

ENGL 151
ENGL 161
6 hours of Cultural or Conceptual Perspectives
6 hours of Specialized Perspectives
6 hours of Perspectives in Writing

 

*Any class that fulfills the “W” General Education Requirement has the prerequisite of WRIT 101 (with a passing grade of C- or better).

**All classes are 3 credit hours unless otherwise specified.

 


Foundation Courses:

ENGL 151 Introduction to Literature. An introduction for first-year students to the study of fiction, poetry, and drama. Emphasizes close reading and analysis of texts representing these genres. (L)

ENGL 161 Methods of Literary Study. This is the foundational course for English majors and minors. It includes an intense study of literary genres, techniques, terms, and themes, and emphasizes literary analysis, close reading, and research skills.


Cultural Perspectives:

These courses emphasize the study of a broad range of literature within historical and cultural contexts. They are designed to give students a foundation for the more advanced courses that focus on particular periods and authors.

ENGL 201 The Literary Culture of Great Britain I. A survey of English literature from the Middle Ages to the late eighteenth century. (L)

ENGL 202 The Literary Culture of Great Britain II. A survey of the English literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. (L)

ENGL 203 The Literary Culture of the United States I. A survey of United States literature from the colonial period to the Civil War. (L)

ENGL 204 The Literary Culture of the United States II. A survey of the United States literature of the late-19th and 20th centuries. (L,W)

Specialized Perspectives:

These courses enable a more narrowly focused study of authors, genres,
and critical theory. One course must be pre-19th century.

ENGL 320 Introduction to Linguistics. The bases of the scientific study of language: the sounds that make up human languages (phonetics), the combining of sounds (phonology), the structuring of words (morphology), the structuring of sentences (syntax), and the derivation of meaning from words, sentences, and texts (semantics). (Q)

ENGL 322 Representative American Writers I. An examination of one American author or a combination of American authors who wrote during the 17th, 18th, or 19th centuries.

ENGL 323 Representative American Writers II. An examination of one American author or a combination of American authors who wrote during the 17th, 18th, or 19th centuries.

ENGL 324 African-American Literature. The class will study literature produced by African-American authors and theoretical texts dealing with African-American literature with a view toward developing a more complete understanding of American culture and literary movements, developing skills in analysis and interpretation, and enhancing writing skills. (W, X)

ENGL 336 Studies in the Early American Novel. An examination of selected American novels, by authors ranging from Brown to James, that represent the evolving tradition of novel writing in the United States from the late 18th century to 1900.

ENGL 337 Studies in the Later American Novel. An examination of selected American novels, by authors ranging from Faulkner to Morrison, that illustrate modernist and post-modernist techniques.

ENGL 342 Representative British Writers I. An examination of one British author or a combination of British authors who wrote from the medieval period through the 18th century. (L, W)

ENGL 343 Representative British Writers II. An examination of one British author or a combination of British authors who wrote during the 19th and 20th centuries.

ENGL 350 Shakespeare. An examination, in the context of the entire canon, of plays representative of the main periods of Shakespeare’s development. (L, W)

ENGL 356 Studies in the Early British Novel. An examination of selected British novels by authors such as Fielding, Austen, and Hardy who shaped the development of the English-language novel through the late 19th century. (L, W).

ENGL 357 Studies in the Later British Novel. An examination of selected British novels, by authors ranging from Lawrence to Byatt, that illustrate modernist and post-modernist techniques.

ENGL 360 Studies in British and American Poetry. An examination of significant poets and poetic traditions in British and American poetry.

ENGL 362 Topical Perspectives in Literature. An examination of the fiction, poetry, drama, and/or film that represent a literary movement or critical approach to the study of literature. Topics, which will vary with each course offering, include the Harlem Renaissance, the pre-Raphaelites, and historical images of women in literature.

ENGL 364 Topical Perspectives in Film Study. An examination of a special topic related to film or the relationship of film and literature. Topics, which will vary with each course offering, include the leader on film and men and masculinity in film.

ENGL 372 Literary Theory. An examination of the foundations of literary criticism: its history, methods, and practical applications.

Capstone:

The final course for the major requires that students put into practice what they have learned about literary criticism, research, and writing. ENGL 410 Senior Seminar. A seminar for senior English majors that focuses on the literature and literary background of a specific century. The topic focus will change each year. Together, students will examine a critical/historical text that offers a perspective on their literary research. Then each student will conduct research on one author or theme relevant to the century. This research should result in a significant paper, which will be presented in a public forum. Prerequisite: ENGL 161, Methods of Literary Study.

To view full audit sheets for both major and minors click here.

 


Conceptual Perspectives:

These courses offer a conceptual approach to literature, introducing students to some of the religious, social, scientific, and philosophical ideas that inform authors and enrich their work.

ENGL 205 Concepts of Postcolonialism. A study of cultural notions of power and identity as they inform literature produced by specific cultures emerging from colonialism in the twentieth century. (L, W, M)

ENGL 210 The Bible as Literature. A study of the themes and forms of biblical texts, including Genesis, Judges, Ruth, and the Gospels. (L)

ENGL 215 Myth and Folklore. A study of world folklore and ancient and classical myths, both Eastern and Western, including works of Homer, Virgil, and Ovid as well as Gilgamesh and The Ramayana. (L)

ENGL 220 Concepts of Diversity. A study of concepts of diversity and “otherness” as reflected in poetry, prose, and film. Topics may include race, ethnicity, socioeconomic background, sexuality, and religion. (L, X).

ENGL 225 Film as Literature. A comparative study of concepts of narration as they are reflected in literature and film. (L,W).

ENGL 230 Literature into Film. A comparative study of short stories, novels, and plays and their film adaptations. (L, W).

ENGL 235 Concepts of Gender. A study of cultural notions of gender and sexuality as they are reflected in and constructed by literary texts ranging from the classics to contemporary science fiction. (L,W)

ENGL 240 Concepts of Progress. A historical study of attitudes toward progress as they are reflected in literary and critical texts ranging from Greek myths to contemporary novels. (L)

ENGL 245 Concepts of Tragedy. A historical study of the concept of tragedy in Western culture as it is reflected in readings ranging from the Bible to modern novels.

ENGL 255 Concepts of Nature. A historical study of concepts of nature as they are reflected in readings ranging from the Bible to contemporary poetry, drama, and fiction. (L,W)

ENGL 260 Concepts of Place. A study of cultural notions of place as they inform literature, this course will study a wide range of literary texts representing a particular region. (L, W)


Perspectives in Writing:

These advanced writing courses represent a variety of types, strategies and styles.
 
WRIT 290 Introduction to Creative Writing. The study and practice of three genres of creative writing--poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction--as well as the skill of evaluating work in these genres. (W)

WRIT 301 Short Fiction Workshop. This course will introduce students to the art of writing short stories. Students will read contemporary short stories from around the globe, write short exercises to jump-start the writing process, and write, workshop, and revise several short stories for their portfolios.

WRIT 302 Creative Nonfiction. The study and writing of expository essays with emphasis on the development of purposeful stylistic and organizational strategies. Recommended for students seeking certification in English. (W)

WRIT 303 Poetry Workshop. Students will work as poets or “makers,” gaining exercise in crafting images, making music, evoking sensations. As apprentice poets, students will read extensively in the field. The selection of poems and poetics assigned for the course is intended to illuminate students’ artistic preferences and to generate new directions for writing.

WRIT 305 Business Writing. Business Writing is designed for sophomore and junior-level Business & Economics majors. Business writing will emphasize problem and audience analysis, formatting and documentation, and the inclusion of visual elements. Students will learn basic formats of various reports, memos, and correspondence. Special attention will be paid to proposals, grants, resumes / cover letters, cross-cultural communication, and writing ethics. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (W)

WRIT 306 The Rhetoric of Science. This class will introduce students to the discipline of rhetoric as it is applied to scientific writing. Students will read and discuss major works by both scientists and rhetoricians including Aristotle, Charles Darwin, Rachel Carson, James Watson, Stephen Jay Gould, Thomas Kuhn, and Alan Gross. (W)

WRIT 307 Technical Writing. Technical Writing is designed for junior-level petroleum engineering and geology majors. Technical writing will emphasize problem and audience analysis, formatting and documentation, and the inclusion of visual elements. Students will learn basic formats of technical reports, feasibility studies, instructions, manuals, and resumes / cover letters. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (W)

WRIT 308 Persuasive Writing. The application of rhetorical principles in writing credible and persuasive arguments. A unit on grant writing is included. (W)

WRIT 310 Self-Expression. The study and practice of modes of life history writing—journal, memoir, autobiography and/or biography.

WRIT 312 Topical Perspectives in Writing. A concentration on specific themes and/or methods of writing such as nature writing or film scripts. Topics will vary with each offering.

 

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