Faculty Development programs are designed to help strengthen faculty members' disciplinary ties by supporting projects in the "scholarship of discovery" (research) and the "scholarship of teaching" (ways to transmit knowledge and excite future scholars). The projects should benefit the faculty member and support the college's core values.

Awards are competitive and recommendations submitted to the Provost are based on proposals submitted to the Faculty Development Committee.

The Faculty Development Committee prefers to receive applications/proposals as electronic submissions.

Suggestions for electronic submission:

  1. Submitted materials should be in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel or Adobe Acrobat (pdf) format. Submission in other file formats may delay or prevent consideration of the proposal. If possible, all materials for the submission should be included in a single file.
  2. Forms are available for Minigrants and Mentor Grants.
  3. Applications, proposals, and nominations should be emailed to the chair of the Faculty Development Committee (FacDev@marietta.edu). If the attached file can be opened, you will receive a return e-mail confirming the receipt of the proposal. The e-mail accompanying the attached file should clearly state what type of proposal is being submitted. If you have any questions about the electronic submission procedure, please contact the chair of the Faculty Development Committee, Ann Bragg, by email (aeb002@marietta.edu) or by phone (740.376.4589)

Deadlines: Midnight on the dates indicated

October 12, 2017: Minigrants/Mentor Grants, Round 1

October 26, 2017: Sabbaticals

October 26, 2017: Professional Improvement Grants (PIGs)

January 18, 2018: Research Award

January 18, 2018: Innovative Teaching Award

February 1, 2018: Minigrants/Mentor Grants, Round 2

April 12, 2018: Minigrants/Mentor Grants, Round 3

There will be five Faculty Forums in 2017-18, on Friday, September 22, Friday, November 3, Friday, February 2, Friday, March 2, and Friday, April 13.

Applications, proposals, and nominations should be sent to the chair of the Faculty Development Committee at FacDev@marietta.edu.

Load Reduction: There will be no application in 2017-2018.

Awards Available

Innovative Teaching Awards

Nominations are invited for Innovative Teaching Awards.

Up to three $2,000 awards will be made to faculty members who have implemented innovative teaching techniques. Each award can be used as a salary enhancement, for professional development expenses, or for some combination thereof. The purpose of the awards is to encourage excellence and growth in teaching among Marietta College faculty. Selection of award recipients will be made by the Faculty Development Committee and recipients will be recognized at the Founders Day Ceremony in February. Faculty members can be nominated by any member of the college community; however, self-nomination is encouraged because it makes it easier to complete a high-quality nomination. An innovation that was nominated in a previous year that did not receive the award may be nominated again. Nominations should be submitted via e-mail to the Faculty Development Committee chair at FacDev@marietta.edu.

A nomination consists of the following documents:

  1. A cover letter of at most 1 page.
  2. A description of the innovation of at most 1 page.
  3. At the discretion of the nominator, a summary sheet of selected supporting materials of at most 2 pages may also be submitted.

Document (1) is required. It must include the following administrative information.

  • Date that the nomination is submitted
  • A brief title to identify the innovation
  • Name and department of the nominee
  • Name and department of the nominator
  • Signature of the nominator
  • Self-nominations must include a signed statement of support from the department chair of the nominee in lieu of nominator requirements.

Document (2) is required. It should consist of narrative describing the innovation. It should include the following information, as appropriate.

  • What was done?
  • In what way is it innovative?
  • What existing approach does it replace or supplement?
  • How long has it been in development?
  • How long has it been put into practice?
  • In what ways was it meant to be an improvement?
  • Is there evidence that it actually was an improvement?
  • Will the innovation lead to lasting change or future related work?

Document (3) is not required. If submitted, it should consist of selected supporting materials, compiled into a concise document, that has been chosen to present evidence that supports claims made in document (2).

The following factors are considered when determining winning nominations.

  • Implementation of the innovation must have started no more than 5 years prior to the year of the nomination.
  • How substantial are the curricular changes associated with the innovation?
  • How much time and effort was required to implement the innovation, beyond ordinary teaching responsibilities?
  • To what extent is the innovation an improvement over the existing approach?
  • Have positive outcomes been documented, with evidence provided in document (3)?
All nominees will be notified of decisions before Founders Day

Load Reduction Program

The Load Reduction Program (LRP) reduces a full-time teaching faculty member's teaching load by one course for one semester. Up to $1000 is available to cover expenses connected with the project. Faculty with load reductions may not teach day, evening, or weekend courses on an overload basis, here or elsewhere, or for the Institute of Learning in Retirement (or any similar agency of the College) during the semester of the reduction. Reduced loads will not be given for administrative work. The FDC reviews LRPs and makes recommendations to the dean.

A Research Load Reduction (RLR) provides release time to allow pursuit of a research project. An Instructional Load Reduction(ILR) provides release time to allow pursuit of a pedagogy project.

Criteria for Selection

While the criteria for Load Reductions are similar to those described for sabbaticals, Load Reductions are intended to fund projects that are smaller in scope compared to sabbaticals. Faculty receiving Load Reductions are required to provide a written report, of no more than two pages, on work accomplished.

Application Format

Submit Load Reduction applications to the Faculty Development Committee Chair. If your application includes materials that can not be sent in an electronic format forward 10 hard copies.

Failure to follow the proposal format or guidelines may exclude the applicant from being recommended for funding. If time permits, promising proposals that need more work will be returned to the applicant for revisions.

Summary of project and outcomes: Briefly summarize the project and clearly state, in specific terms, the goals of your project. Demonstrate how the project will improve your professional development (for RLR) or teaching effectiveness (for ILR), and describe the benefits you see for yourself, students, and/or the college community. Discuss how the project goes beyond your regular faculty responsibilities and describe the specific outcomes you see resulting from your project.

Qualifications: Summarize your qualifications and those of each project member. Briefly describe previous work (e.g., publications, presentations, etc.), training, and experience in the project area. The goal is to demonstrate that you have expertise, ability, and commitment to accomplish the project objectives.

Action Plan: Give a step-by-step description of what you plan to do and the rationale for doing it. Relate these actions to the objectives of the project.

Relevant Literature: Provide a brief review of relevant literature on the topic of your project.

Funding History: List all Faculty Development funding: minigrants, load reductions, professional improvement grants, and sabbaticals you have received during the past three years, and indicate whether or not you have submitted the two-page report required for load reductions, professional improvement grants and sabbaticals.

Departmental Support: Provide evidence of departmental support. This could be a brief letter from your department chair which indicates how your project fits department goals and how your course load reduction will impact the department. (If you are a department chair, attach a letter from the Provost or a senior department member.)

Expenses: Present an itemized list of anticipated expenses. Valid expenses include supplies, student salaries, travel, or other items deemed important to the project. Applicants are encouraged to investigate other sources of funding for the items listed above (e.g., minigrants, outside grants, work study, etc.).

Mentor Grants

Mentor Grants provide funds to help faculty members accompany students to conferences or competitions where the faculty member is not usually a direct participant in the conference. Mentor Grants will reimburse the faculty member's travel, conference fees, and hotel expenses within certain limits.

Here's how to do it:

  • If the conference is a professional development experience for the faculty member, instructors are encouraged to seek funding for a Minigrant prior to applying for the Mentor Grant.
  • Submit the Mentor Grant application, in which you will provide us with an estimate of the costs, electronically.
  • Each application should be accompanied by a short narrative, not to exceed three paragraphs, describing the event.
What kinds of proposals have been funded in the past?

Mentor Grants have funded a wide range of trips--from competitions in Ohio to conferences in Texas.

How to Apply

Submit application form as an electronic file to the Faculty Development Committee Chair.

Failure to follow the proposal format or guidelines will exclude the applicant from being recommended for funding.

 

Minigrants

Minigrants are cash awards given to faculty who have plans for projects that will improve their scholarship and/or enable them to gain knowledge or skills beyond the normal growth expected of faculty in order to improve teaching and support the college's core values. The minigrant should be used to support those projects that are beyond the scope of a department's budget and are too small for external funding. All voting faculty may apply. Reimbursement is made upon presentation of receipts and corroborating evidence.

Minigrants are limited to a maximum of $2,000 per faculty member per academic year.

This year, however, faculty presenters (broadly defined to also include chairing sessions, serving on panels, and serving as discussants) will be eligible for an additional $500 in FDC support towards the cost of attending a meeting at which they will present. This $500 is in addition to the $2000 per-person annual cap on minigrant funding; both the $2000 and $500 limits are subject to available funding.

In the event that faculty requests for minigrant funding exceed our overall budget, faculty who are presenting will be funded at a higher rate than those who are not. In addition, should this occur, requests for less assistance will be funded at a higher rate than will requests for larger amounts.

Funding possibilities for minigrants include:

  • Travel expenses to present a paper (or the equivalent) at a recognized professional meeting
  • Purchase of research materials or equipment that are not typically purchased by the college or department and that are essential for the individual's scholarly project
  • Travel expenses to a conference, workshop, or training program
  • Costs incurred by a faculty member whose manuscript has already been accepted for publication

How to Apply

Submit application form as an electronic file to the Faculty Development Committee Chair.

Failure to follow the proposal format or guidelines will exclude the applicant from being recommended for funding.

Professional Improvement Grants

Full-time teaching faculty may apply for Professional Improvement Grant (PIG) funds for summer projects. Each successful PIG proposal participant will receive up to $2,500 to be divided between a stipend and expenses. The entire $2,500 may be used toward expenses without taking a stipend if the applicant so desires. However, the maximum stipend allowed will be $2,000.

Proposals may involve a single faculty member, or a team of faculty members and students. For projects involving multiple faculty members, each faculty member requesting funding should apply separately. Applicants are encouraged to seek external funding for long term projects. Keep in mind, PIG funds can be used as matching money for external grants.

Criteria for Selection

A major goal of the proposed project should be to help strengthen the connection between the faculty member involved in the project and his or her discipline. This could take many forms including (but not limited to) publishable research, papers, panels, essays, books, works of art, reviews, software, etc. The project will usually result in some tangible outcome such as publication, exhibition, or some other form of public presentation. It is the proposer's responsibility to convince the Faculty Development Committee that the project will strengthen disciplinary connections.

Faculty receiving PIGs are required to provide a written report (no more than two pages) on work accomplished to the Provost.

Application Format

Submit your Professional Improvement Grant application as an electronic file to the Faculty Development Committee Chair at FacDev@marietta.edu with the following information:

Summary of project and outcomes: Briefly summarize the project and clearly state, in specific terms, the goals of your project. Demonstrate how the project will improve your professional development and describe the benefits you see for yourself, students, and/or the college community. Discuss how the project goes beyond your regular faculty responsibilities and describe the specific outcomes you see resulting from your project.

Qualifications: Summarize your qualifications and those of each project member. Briefly describe previous work (e.g., publications, presentations, etc.), training, and experience in the project area. The goal is to demonstrate that you have expertise, ability, and commitment to accomplish the project objectives.

Action Plan: Give a step-by-step description of what you plan to do and the rationale for doing it. Relate these actions to the objectives of the project. Please indicate other responsibilities that you will have during the project period. PIG applicants should detail how they are going limit other duties so they may focus on their PIG projects.

Relevant Literature: Provide a brief review of relevant literature on the topic of your project.

Funding History: List all Faculty Development funding (LRP, PIG, and sabbaticals) you have received during the past three years that relate to this PIG application. `

Departmental Support: Provide evidence of departmental support. This could be a brief letter from your department chair which indicates how your project fits department goals and how your PIG will impact the department. (If you are a department chair, attach a letter from the Provost or a senior department member.)

Expenses: Present an itemized list of anticipated expenses. Valid expenses include supplies, student salaries, travel, or other items deemed important to the project. Applicants are encouraged to investigate other sources of funding for the items listed above (e.g., mini grants, outside grants, work study, etc.).

Please note, if your application includes materials that cannot be sent in an electronic format forward 10 hard copies.

Research Awards

The research award recognizes a faculty member for a significant scholarly contribution to his or her discipline. The award winner will receive $2000 that can be used toward professional development materials or activities. Selection of award recipients will be made by the Faculty Development Committee, usually in January, for recognition at the Founders Day ceremony in February. Award money must be used within 18 months of the award being granted or it will be forfeited.

Criteria for Selection

To be considered for the award, the research product (e.g., book, article, exhibition, performance) will have been produced within the three years prior to the time the award is made. Examples of strong proposals might include:

  • Publication of a book or article (external and peer-reviewed)
  • Production of a work commissioned, invited or funded by an external entity
  • Publication, exhibition, or performance in a juried venue
  • Favorable review in an international or national publication
  • External evidence of widespread use of the product in the discipline (e.g., citations, number of libraries holding the book, etc.)
  • Other worth endeavors

Application Procedure

Faculty members can be self-nominated or nominated by any member of the college community. Applications should be submitted electronically to FacDev@marietta.edu.

The application for a research award must include the following:

  • A brief letter of nomination
  • A one-page abstract summarizing the research and how it contributes to the discipline
  • A supporting letter from the department chair, or other authority in the discipline, which explains the significance of the contribution and the nature of the venue of publication, exhibition, or performance of the creative product
  • A copy of the publication or other tangible evidence of the product (e.g., photographs of an exhibition). Copies will be returned to the applicant after the decision has been made.

It is recommended that the applicant also include supplementary supporting material, e.g., reviews of the product, brochures from an exhibit, letters from the commissioning organization, etc.

Sabbaticals

A sabbatical enables a tenured faculty member to engage in literary, scientific, or artistic study and/or research. Faculty members may receive a first sabbatical after five years of service and not more frequently than every seventh year after that. A regular sabbatical is either a half-pay, full academic year leave or a full pay, half year leave (full pay, full year sabbatical leaves are possible but must be arranged with the Provost prior to application to FDC). The College will grant sabbatical leaves for not more than 15 percent of the tenured faculty in any one academic year. For the purpose of this calculation, a full-year full-pay sabbatical counts as the equivalent of two leaves

The Faculty Development Committee reviews applications and makes recommendations to the Provost and the President. As stated in the Faculty Handbook (section V.C.3), a faculty member taking a sabbatical leave will be expected to return to full-time service at the College for at least two years immediately thereafter.

Criteria for Selection

A major goal of the proposed project should be to help strengthen the connection between the faculty member involved in the project and his or her discipline. This could take many forms including (but not limited to) publishable research, papers, panels, essays, books, works of art, reviews, software, etc. The project will usually result in some tangible outcome such as publication, exhibition, or some other form of public presentation. It is the proposer's responsibility to convince the Faculty Development Committee that the project will strengthen disciplinary connections.

Proposals involving course development or improving teaching effectiveness will be considered, but must show a major change of direction for the proposer, rather than a simple review and/or enhancement of current subject areas or teaching methods. Applicants will need to demonstrate some expertise in the skills required for their projects, e.g., musical or artistic composition, computer proficiency, competence in statistics or foreign language, and so on.

Faculty receiving sabbaticals are required to provide a written report, of no more than two pages, on work accomplished to the Faculty Development Committee and the Provost.

Application Format

Submit your sabbatical application as an electronic file to the Faculty Development Committee Chair. If your application includes materials that cannot be sent in an electronic format forward 10 hard copies.

Failure to follow the proposal format or guidelines may exclude the applicant from being recommended for funding. A sabbatical applicant may, or may not, be given the opportunity to revise his/her proposal. Ultimately, it is the applicant who bears responsibility for the merit of the proposal.

Summary of project and outcomes: Briefly summarize the project and clearly state, in specific terms, the goals of your project. Demonstrate how the project will improve your professional development and describe the benefits you see for yourself, students, and/or the college community. Discuss how the project goes beyond your regular faculty responsibilities and describe the specific outcomes you see resulting from your project.

Qualifications: Summarize your qualifications and those of each project member. Briefly describe previous work (e.g., publications, presentations, etc.), training, and experience in the project area. The goal is to demonstrate that you have expertise, ability, and commitment to accomplish the project objectives.

Action Plan: Give a step-by-step description of what you plan to do and the rationale for doing it. Relate these actions to the objectives of the project.

Relevant Literature: Provide a brief review of relevant literature on the topic of your project.

Funding History: List all Faculty Development funding: indicate when you had your last sabbatical; list all load reductions, and professional improvement grants that you have received during the past three years. Also indicate whether or not you have submitted the two-page report required for load reductions, professional improvement grants, and sabbatical.

Departmental Support: Provide evidence of departmental support. This could be a brief letter from your department chair which indicates how your project fits department goals and how your absence from teaching will impact the department(s) in which you teach. (If you are a department chair, attach a letter from a senior faculty member.)

Committee Members

Ann Bragg, chair
Jay Dougherty
John Fazio
Marilee Morrow
Susan Peterson
Harrison Potter