Marietta College selected as ‘Great College to Work For’

Great Colleges

Marietta College is being recognized for the first time as a “Great College to Work For” by The Chronicle of Higher Education, a top trade publication for colleges and universities. Now in its 11th year, the “Great Colleges to Work For” annual report recognizes the colleges that get top ratings from their employees regarding workforce practices and policies.

The Chronicle released its 2018 results on July 16, based on a survey of 253 colleges and universities, including 165 four-year institutions and 88 two-year institutions. Marietta is one of 84 colleges and universities to receive this prestigious designation, including 60 four-year institutions.

Marietta is included among the small colleges and universities with 2,999 students or fewer.

“The recognition of Marietta College as one of the ‘Great Colleges to Work For’ in the country is a reflection of the amazing commitment and engagement that you see from our gifted faculty and staff,” said Bill Ruud, President and Professor of Management at Marietta. “We are honored to receive this recognition, and I am confident our amazing employees will continue to make Marietta an outstanding place to work.”

Marietta College was selected for recognition in three categories: Job Satisfaction, Teaching Environment (Faculty Only) and Tenure Clarity & Process (Faculty Only/4-year Only).

“We are very fortunate in the fact that many, if not all, of our most productive scholars are also committed, innovative teachers,” said Dr. Joe Sullivan, Associate Professor of English. “Teaching isn’t the bill-paying part of the day at Marietta College. Faculty members and the academic staff who support them are genuinely enthusiastic about and, luckily for us, quite talented in fostering student learning.”

Sullivan noted that since Marietta is a small school, the faculty know what each other is doing and they are inspired by each other.

“We know of the departments whose faculty go the extra mile to introduce research to their first-year majors,” he said. “We see the faculty who work across departments to organize internships in town and we see those who lead study abroad trips halfway around the world. We respect how our colleagues seamlessly integrate technology, Special Collections, field work, creative projects, civic service and metacognition into their courses and it all adds up to a being a rewarding place to teach.”  

The survey results are based on a two-part assessment process: an institutional audit that captured demographics and workplace policies, and a survey administered to faculty, administrators and professional support staff. The primary factor in deciding whether an institution received recognition was the employee feedback.

“The ‘Great Colleges to Work For’ distinction is well-known by academic jobseekers as a sign that an institution’s employees are valued and given opportunities for growth even when they face financial constraints,” said Liz McMillen, editor of The Chronicle. “Any college or university that’s on the list is showing that they emphasize one of their most valuable assets: their faculty and staff.”

To administer the survey and analyze the results, The Chronicle of Higher Education worked with ModernThink LLC, a strategic human capital consulting firm that has conducted numerous “Best Places to Work” programs, surveying hundreds of thousands of employees nationwide.

“It’s easier to be a great workplace during good times, but it’s when times are tough that the commitment to workplace quality really gets tested,” said Richard K. Boyer, principal and managing partner, ModernThink LLC. “And those institutions that measure up during times of economic hardship reinforce their already strong cultures and put even more distance between them and their peer institutions for whom they compete for talent.”

“Great Colleges to Work For” is one of the largest and most comprehensive workplace study in higher education.